Cinequest 2015: The House On Pine Street

FoCCinequest is San Jose’s preeminent film festival, celebrating its 25th anniversary this year. In this daily film journal, I’ll be trying to spotlight films you might otherwise miss and let you know when you’ll be able to catch them again.

 The House On Pine Street

Written and Directed by Aaron and Austin Keeling, and co-written by Nathalie Jones
Mon, Mar 2 10:00 PM,Sat, Mar 7 11:59 PM 
Buy tickets here

thops0The elements are all there. The kind of creepy house. The somewhat distant husband. Wife with a recent problem in her past that strains the marriage, and the nosey relative with her own manipulative agenda. And oh yeah, creepy neighbors with strange twins. And it all delivers in The House on Pine Street, the second “haunting” story I’ve viewed at Cinequest, but one distinctly more tense and frightening than Afterlife.

Pregnant Jennifer, Emily Goss, and her husband, Taylor Bottles, have recently left Chicago for a change of scenery, and to be closer to Jennifer’s Mother. A friend happened to have a fully furnished house, yes on Pine Street, where they can go and recuthops3perate as they prepare for Jennifer’s delivery. Jennifer takes an instant dislike to the house, feels wrong from the start, but gives in to her husband and mother’s arguments to make a go of it here for a while. Something happened in Chicago, and we feel that Jennifer may not be fully recovered, and hopefully the slower pace and family support will be just what she needs.

Of course, it’s not.

thops2Alone at home much of the time while here husband begins work at a new office, Jennifer begins to feel that there’s more than a bit of creepy feeling about this house. There’s something definitely leaving doors open where they were closed. Knocks on the door with no one there. Things just slightly out of place, make things just slightly too upsetting for Jennifer. None of this done in a manner anyone else can see, Jennifer is the only witness. A visit from a close girlfriend and her child, meant to settle her in with the comfort of familiarity ends badly with Jennifer looking like more of a threat than a victim.

thops1Of course that isolates her more, the family still trying to work in her best interests now puts her much more in direct conflict with whatever is going on in their home. Her marriage is strained and we learn more about the problems she had in Chicago, which of course do not work in her favor here.

To say more would go directly into the realm of spoilers so I’ll just say that the plot and script are excellent, there are few places where you’re not on edge, you simply aren’t allowed to relax and enjoy the terrific cinematography. This film does not come off as a traditional independent effort, and could easily be a standard release. Casting is is great especially Emily Goss’ as Jennifer, who is both tremendously at risk as the pregnant victim of the haunting who is able to muster herself as necessary without becoming one of those stereotypical badass ghost hunters. Love you Sigourney and Milla, but you just aren’t believable in a realistic context. Emily is.

The House on Pine Street is both a well-crafted traditional horror story, and a modern exploration of what haunting and haunted actually mean. More than a little is left up to your interpretation at the end. But that’s cool, because a film like this should haunt you long after you leave the theater.

Ric Bretschneider
March 1st, 2015

Posted in Cinequest, Entertainment, Media, Movies, Personal, Review, SciFi Fantasy | Tagged , , , | Leave a comment

Cinequest 2015: Clew

FoCCinequest is San Jose’s preeminent film festival, celebrating its 25th anniversary this year. In this daily film journal, I’ll be trying to spotlight films you might otherwise miss and let you know when you’ll be able to catch them again.

 Clew

Directed by Eric Badros, written by Eric Badros, Heather Weeks and Taylor Graham
Sat, Feb 28 11:45 AM, Wed, Mar 4 4:15 PM 
Buy tickets here

c5I’ve previously mentioned the unexpected beauty of films where constraints of time and budget have required the creative team to be clever and thoughtful. Small films tend to benefit from this while larger budget films are just “dialing it in” on story and relying on special effects and revisiting popular themes.

c3The science fiction tale Clew is a good example of this phenomenon.

Jack Hadrian is a painter living in the mid-21st century who has tragically lost his wife. After adopting a secluded lifestyle, he pathologically never leaves his apartment relying on home delivery of groceries and basically shutting off the outside world, he finally decides to contract the persistent Muse corporation for a new perfect partner.  Muse creates Muses, a genetically engineered “humans” who are designed to be the perfect fit for the customer. A new companion, with a zero percent return rate.

c1Of course there seems to be something shady about the Muse corporation. Not obviously evil, but maybe…

There are a couple of rules that go along with the contract. Jack is responsible for the well-being and support of his muse, and he must never, ever get her wet or feed her after midnight… oh wait.  No. Wrong movie. <shuffles notes> Ah, yes. He must never, ever tell her that she is a Muse.

And then there’s the warning that occasionally Muses will… maybe… break things.

c4What follows is a slow descent from heaven into hell for Jack. Or is it? Could it be that this Muse is exactly like the mythological Muses who inspired artists? Could it be it’s actually all for the best? Or is something entirely different going on here?

c2If you like puzzles, especially those that expose a new  puzzle when you’ve gotten past the first answer, Clew is for you. While appearing quite spartan in its staging and photography, it’s absolutely packed with metaphors, references, and of course clues.  Pay attention to the word that flashes when Jack is getting a brain scan, and look up the mythological reference to the word clew. What were those muttered words? Now check out the poster design. Yes, you may need to see it twice to catch everything.

But I’ve said too much. I wasn’t supposed to tell you that you’re a…

This week and next we’ll take daily looks at Cinequest movie offerings that still offer opportunities for you to catch at the festival.  Subscribe now so you won’t miss any!

Ric Bretschneider
February 28th, 2015

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Cinequest 2015: Astraea

CFoCinequest is San Jose’s preeminent film festival, celebrating its 25th anniversary this year. In this daily film journal, I’ll be trying to spotlight films you might otherwise miss and let you know when you’ll be able to catch them again.

 Astraea

Directed by Kristjan Thor, Written by Ashlin Halfnight
Sun, Mar 1 11:30 AM, Tue, Mar 3 2:00 PM 
Buy tickets here

Astraea1

The independent science fiction film is a wonderful place to play. Because your funding is smaller, there are fewer expectations from backers that you’ll “follow the trends.” The lower funding also tends to force filmmakers to be more creative in their filming, rely on fewer special effects and focus on the story and the character’s development.

And that’s a great place to grow an inventive movie.

In a market where every post-apocalyptic movie has it’s heart in an alien invasion or zombie uprising, we’re faced in Astraea with an all-too-possible scenario where a disease quickly and efficiently wiped out most of the population. The few survivors are crafty and cautious, knowing that men are far worse danger than any rotting corpse, and that making connections with the few remaining good folks is probably the most precious thing to pursue.

Astraea3

Nerea Duhart plays Astraea, a driven young woman. Haunted by visions, she finds herself unexpectedly developing a form of telepathy or clairvoyance.  In what is probably one of the best explanations for such a turn, Astraea’s gifts are potentially manifesting now because the population has dwindled, or electricity is rare, or both or something else. She and her brother, played by Scotty Crow, are literally trekking across the country in search of family that Astraea is absolutely sure are still alive.

Astraea2Hard decisions surface when they encounter another couple, cousins played by Jessica Cummings and Dan O’Brien. Of course, there’s a lot of trust and faith to be built, and the eventual decision whether to move forward on Astraea’s quest or stay in the relative comfort of this new family. Can they actually trust Astrea’s visions? And if they stay, are they truly welcome?

Astraea4Beautifully shot, and nicely paced, this is easily the most reserved and realistic post-apocalyptic story since the BBC’s legendary Survivors series. The cast is wonderful and the resolution as complete as you could wish for in such a situation.

We recommend this apocalypse.

This week and next we’ll take daily looks at Cinequest movie offerings that still offer opportunities for you to catch at the festival.  Subscribe now so you won’t miss any!

Ric Bretschneider
February 25th, 2015

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Cinequest 2015: Aspie Seeks Love

CFoCinequest is San Jose’s preeminent film festival, celebrating its 25th anniversary this year. In this daily film journal, I’ll be trying to spotlight films you might otherwise miss and let you know when you’ll be able to catch them again.

 Aspie Seeks Love

Directed, Written by Julie Sokolow
Fri, Feb 27 7:45 PM, Sun, Mar 1 4:45 PM, Wed, Mar 4 2:45 PM 
Buy tickets here

asl1

The documentary is not a form I’m drawn to, except perhaps during Cinequest. So far we’re two for two, with the splendid Batkid Begins which opened the festival, and now with the surprisingly pleasant, humorous, and inspiring Aspie Seeks Love.

asl4Aspie is not a person, at least not directly. Aspie is short for Asperger’s Syndrome, or Disorder, which notably manifests in difficulties in social interaction. The person here is David Mathews, who reminds us in the film that he is not related to the “caterwauling alt-rock singer.” And that’s pretty much David, he’s clever, funny, and a bit out of touch with how he’s going to be perceived by people he meets.

So what does David want? Pretty much what everyone wants; someone to talk to, to listen, a companion, hopefully eventually a sexual partner. When watching another older couple, he expresses hopes that someday when he’ll similarly have grown old with his own companion. And that’s pretty much what the documentary promises.

asl3Except it’s not.

While we’re entertained by the oddly composed and posted flyers,  the quirky locations David chooses for them, and the short interviews with prospective dates, that’s really the shallow end of this pool.

David, we find, is a persistent writer of fiction, performs public readings, is an artist, a devout vegan, and an extremely honest fellow when it comes to discussing his good and bad points. He has clearly formed and tightly held social and political views that he shares freely and with no small amount of sarcasm. He’s a fully rendered human being, and that’s really not what we expected. With the main narrative charmingly delivered in his self-admitted robotically hesitant voice, which is totally clear in pronunciation, he grows on us. Even though for the first few minutes you may wonder why an older Macintosh is narrating the film.

asl2Bringing this picture of a different form of coping and creation, admittedly still full of personal frustration and failures, is the real gift of this movie. David is shown to be working to overcome the problems he has in interactions with others, and does manage to make connections with more people than so many unafflicted might hope for.

And that’s hopeful in itself.

This week and next we’ll take daily looks at Cinequest movie offerings that still offer opportunities for you to catch at the festival.  Subscribe now so you won’t miss any!

Ric Bretschneider
February 27th, 2015

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They Called Me Spock

Spock-Leonard-Nimoy When I was in middle school, I had the undeserved reputation of being a “smug and superior brainiac,” and was punished for it repeatedly by those who were neither. Of course, my grades were only slightly above average, and my standoffishness was just the result of being terribly shy.

This preceding paragraph is no doubt the beginning of so many geeky monologues, as is the rest of this confession. In truth, and cutting to the big finish, we and those like us, have hopefully all found our clans and bonded. But at least in my youth this was not going to happen until many years later.leonard-nimoy-as-mr-spock-in-star-trek-the

The oddest thing about this time was the label, not a name but a word meant to discourage and dismay, my tormentors used to embarrass me was the name of my hero. They called me Spock. And, of course, the confusion and dismay of being ridiculed for just being me was still hurtful, and made me feel rejected, socially a failure, and even more shy. The label itself didn’t matter, it was what the label meant to them, not me.

2013-03-25-leonard_nimoy_as_spockThis never stopped me from talking to anyone who felt similarly about how awesome (I think at the time the translation of awesome was boss) the Star Trek show had been. The three seasons were over, the show long cancelled, and was now available only in reruns. If I discovered a like-minded person we would bond. Friends forever. People like Jeff Smith, Tom Rose, and Gordon Storga were Vulcan brothers to me, and still are to this day.

Of course, Star Trek became The Star Trek Franchise, and with movies and many more television shows the geeky series became as close to mainstream as you can expect. But you know all that. What you don’t know is that Leonard Nimoy stuck with me as being the most important part of my fandom. I really can think of nothing more influential than the portrayal of the ever logical Mr. Spock, who even with all that rational thought at his disposal, could never quite get the hang of his human half.  I admired Nimoy for this and followed his career unflinchingly through everything from Mission Impossible to Fringe.  And of course I enjoyed all his characters, as well as whatever speaking engagements I was able to attend, and his writing. But it they never spoke to me like Spock.

star-trek-2-nimoy-as-spockAnd that is why his death today, even though he had a wonderful and productive life and died at home among family and friends, hits me hard. It’s not rational and, of course, the Spock side of me will try to reason that I should simply shelve the event and honor the man’s life. But the human is inconsolable at the moment. And frankly I’m fine with that.

Because I’m not Spock, I just wanted to be.

Posted in Entertainment, Film, Geeking around, History, Home and Family, Media, Movies, Personal, Random thoughts, SciFi Fantasy, Thoughts | Tagged , , | Leave a comment

Cinequest 2015: Beast Of Cardo (Bestia de Cardo)

CFoCinequest is San Jose’s preeminent film festival, celebrating its 25th anniversary this year. In this daily film journal, I’ll be trying to spotlight films you might otherwise miss and let you know when you’ll be able to catch them again.

 Beast Of Cardo (Bestia de Cardo)

Directed, Written by, and Starring Virginia Sanchez Navarro
Tue, Mar 3 6:00 PM, Sat, Mar 7 4:30 PM
Buy tickets here

boc1
Let me confess. I’m not drawn to movies that are wildly open to interpretation. I have enough vagueries in my regular life to figure out, and the therapeutic or instructional exercise in films that seem to make a virtue of being ungrounded, while not exactly lost on me, are not as welcome as simpler escapism.  Beast of Cardo mostly escapes this criticism, but does fall solidly into the drawer in scenes and themes that bookend an otherwise fairly interesting slice of life tale. How much is metaphor, how much is imagined, or is it all actually  meant to be rationalized in a semi-magical and mythological sense of world?
boc3The film opens with two somewhat unbalancing aspects. First a narrative tale of the city of Cardo, a seemingly unfinished story of a city plunged into darkness and the ruling families that continue to rule based on their recollections of the city when it had light. And second, a brief vision of players, perhaps fleshy marionettes or victims of some loose bondage, suspended on ropes. With little but asides that later might be interpreted as connected, these are not commented on again by the filmmaker until the end of the film, bookending it, and then only one actually makes mute comment.

boc2So almost at once the story begins and shifts to a fairly straightforward tale of a daughter,Moira, previously shamed by rumors of promiscuity, returning to a well-to-do family desperately trying to regain their prestige after another shameful event. Much of the film is discussions of the difficulty, necessity, or even desirability of mending relationships or simply escaping the situation altogether.  Moira and the local dressmaker Hermes (again, the mythological reference is a bit blunt) form a loose friendship, and even execute a blood ritual spell to cause Cardo to be eliminated so they both can be free.

I will say that many of the images crafted in the film are intriguing to watch, and the narrative although repetitive didn’t actually drag. Moira takes very little action to either counter or affect people’s opinion of her, and the idea that she and Hermes need to turn to the supernatural to escape Cardo never really held much weight for me.

Did the spell take, was it successful, are the lighting shifts intended to be representative of supernatural events or just bad wiring in the Dominican Republic? Is this a literal viewing of what happened, or somehow a glimpse into Moira’s eventual disposing of her connections to Cardo and physical escape.

boc4I really don’t know. The answer is either ethereal or blunt, depending on your interpretation of metaphor or perhaps a truly disturbing potential ramification of their actions. You can have it both ways I suppose, but like Moira and Hermes I just want to escape Cardo.

This week and next we’ll take daily looks at Cinequest movie offerings that still offer opportunities for you to catch at the festival.  Subscribe now so you won’t miss any!

Ric Bretschneider
February 25th, 2015

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Cinequest 2015: Afterlife (Utoelet)

CFoCinequest is San Jose’s preeminent film festival, celebrating its 25th anniversary this year. In this daily film journal, I’ll be trying to spotlight films you might otherwise miss and let you know when you’ll be able to catch them again.

 Afterlife (Utoelet)

Directed and Written by Virág Zomborácz, Starring Márton Kristóf, László Gálffi
Tue, Mar 3 9:45 PM, Fri, Mar 6 7:30 PM
Buy tickets here

afterlife3There’s a subtle difference between a ghost story and a haunting story, but we’re not going to go deep there, this is a haunting story. It’s also loveable, funny, and as close to a realistic slice of life as you can get while still entertaining conversations with your dead father.

Mozes, Márton Kristóf, is recently discharged from a therapeutic stay in a facility which may or may not have helped his general confidence issues. His father, László Gálffi,  is overbearing, demanding, and has just decided that Mozes will head out to help leppers when he drops dead. While freeing Mozes from his impending undesired service fate, he soon realizes that the now somewhat mopey ghost of his father is following him about, providing bad and useless advice, and generally disturbing all aspects of Mozes’ life.

afterlifeThe rest of the family is cut from similarly flawed stock. The adopted sister is unable to fend for herself or explain why she returns home with smeared mud and crows feathers decorating her head and clothes. His Aunt is trying to have an affair with a local religious leader, when she isn’t otherwise trying to rule over her sister’s family. And the mother walks from scene to scene as if she were a ghost herself.

afterlife2Mozes’ struggle to figure out why his father won’t pass along is similarly “helped” by the local auto repairman who is a psychic on the side, and a somewhat undependable sometimes girlfriend who just can’t seem to quit any number of addictions.Of course, neither is much help in the end, it’s up to Mozes to actually figure things out, or just stumble into a solution.

So, not exactly Ghostbusters in its scope or plot, but this film does deliver a lot of fun and charm as we watch the dour Mozes struggle through afterlife with father.

This week and next we’ll take daily looks at Cinequest movie offerings that still offer opportunities for you to catch at the festival.  Subscribe now so you won’t miss any!

Ric Bretschneider
February 25th, 2015

Posted in Entertainment, Film, Media, Movies, Personal, Review | Tagged , , , | 1 Comment

Cinequest 2015: Songs She Wrote About People She Knows

CFoCinequest is San Jose’s preeminent film festival, celebrating its 25th anniversary this year. In this daily film journal, I’ll be trying to spotlight films you might otherwise miss and let you know when you’ll be able to catch them again.

 Songs She Wrote About People She Knows

Directed and Written by Kris Elgstrand, Starring Arabella Bushnell
Sat, Feb 28, 3:15 PM, Mon, Mar 2, 7:00 PM Thu, Mar 5, 5:00 PM
Buy tickets here

sswportraitThere’s a familiar sinking feeling, a dread when a film starts with someone undergoing anger therapy who decides to quit the group and deal with it on their own. Rarely does this end well. And even rarer still, does the film turn out to be a musical.

And that’s why Songs She Wrote About People She Knows is just a doubly rare experience.

Carol (Arabella Bushnell) has anger issues. Few of the people she knows bring her anything but disappointment and aggravation. An exercise from the therapy group she has abandoned, she sets about writing songs that express her negative opinions of them, and then delivers the songs in performances left on telephone answering machines. Relatives, acquaintances, and even her boss. This last triggers a series of events that finds her “on the road” with her now ex-boss both looking for a more polished and perhaps popular way to express themselves.

Pictures___Photos_from_Songs_She_Wrote_About_People_She_Knows__2014__-_IMDbWithout giving too much away, the journey is unique, and the relationship… well, it’s fairly unique for a musical comedy.

And this is a comedy, a desert-dry, quirky, and tightly plotted set of crazy encounters. And it is a musical, but due to the unique conceit of having the performer sing as a form of therapeutic communication it’s not the same kind of fantastic fantasy that most musicals expect us to accept, where occasionally the players drift into a parallel universe where their inner thoughts and feelings are given life.  No, everything in Songs She Wrote About People She Knows could have happened in the world where Carol is acting on the singing therapy.

It’s not a musical reality the likes of John Carney’s Once, or even Jersey Boys. These are reasonably talented non-professionals (at least the characters are) who just end up singing their feelings.  And it works.

Pictures___Photos_of_Arabella_Bushnell_-_IMDb 2What’s not to love about someone singing about how much they dislike dislikable characters? Bushnell brings the otherwise visually reserved Carol from someone we’re not sure we like at all, into someone we’re really pulling for by the end. Keeping her reserve straight through to the end, we’re still looking at the same Carol, but perhaps with a little more understanding of what she’s all about.

And the hinted-at sequel?  Well, that’s intriguing as well.

This week and next we’ll take daily looks at Cinequest movie offerings that still offer opportunities for you to catch at the festival.  Subscribe now so you won’t miss any!

Ric Bretschneider
February 25th, 2015

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Cinequest 2015: Booze Boys and Brownies

CFoCinequest is San Jose’s preeminent film festival, celebrating its 25th anniversary this year. In this daily film journal, I’ll be trying to spotlight films you might otherwise miss and let you know when you’ll be able to catch them again.

 Booze Boys and Brownies

Directed, Produced, Written and Starring Veronica Mannion
Wed, Feb 25 7:00 PM, Thu, Mar 5 1:45 PM, Fri, Mar 6 9:30 PM
Buy tickets here

booze_boys__browniesWhen you think about it, the movie musical is a very strange animal. Like any other film, the story is likely humming along with dialog, action, exposition, and the occasional kiss or explosion. Then, exactly as it doesn’t happen in real life, someone bursts into song.

Well, maybe not your real life, happens all the time for me. But I’ll be the first to admit I’m not the average bear.

Movie musical songs typically express a pivotal point in the plot; the awakening of feelings, dealing with stressful or happy situations, a convergence of character plotlines, any of these and more being the things that capture us and get us involved in the story.

Whether meant to be actual songs or fantastic insights into characters’ otherwise unspoken truths, the musical uniquely involves us in the character’s motivations and reactions unlike any common voice over or narration.

bbbVeronica Mannion has provided us with a very modern look at the musical form in Booze Boys and Brownies. Her semi-autobiographical tale of a young woman trying to “find it all” in today’s Los Angeles is frank, charming, rough, and quirky. Fans of independent film will be lulled into what is a fairly compelling set of circumstances and clever dialog and visuals, and the odd lifestyle in which Vivian finds herself at the beginning of the film. She will discuss, text, argue and ponder what it is she wants from life, career, and men at length. It’s a very indy feeling movie.

And then someone will burst into song.bbbfb

To be fair, after one viewing, I can’t recall any of the tunes or specific lyrics. Perhaps that will change when I watch it again, but it’s not as damning as it sounds. They’re charming at the time, but simple and workable. It’s the spontaneity in which a brief performance punctuates the current situation that make this unorthodox aspect really work. The heart of the film never really feels like a musical, but all of a sudden there is it again, jumping out at you.

It really should be noted that Bay Area native Veronica Mannion is doing all the heavy lifting here. Producer, director, writer and co-composer of the music, plus she turns in a terrific performance as her alter-ego Vivian Lynn. Vivian is a recently established Angelino trying to garner fame and fortune, or at least a toe-hold for same, by preparing and performing in a one-woman show. Along the way, she has encounters with past and present romances, a grounding gal-pal in Amber (Ariel Hart), and the occasional song about it all. It’s core musical comedy and it works, freshly and completely.

Thanks for inviting us along Vivian.

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Tomorrow we’ll take a look at another Cinequest movie musical offering, and then you can break into discussion groups and compare and contrast.  Don’t worry, this won’t be on the final exam.

Ric Bretschneider
February 24th, 2015

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Cinequest 2015: My Daily Film Journal

Fanboy Planet started our third year of San Jose film festival Cinequest’s 25th year with our traditional podcast. It’s still available here for your listening pleasure. Cinequest is a wonderful two weeks of films that you otherwise might not be exposed to, smaller production houses, new ideas that aren’t “saleable in Hollywood.”  You know, the stuff we all claim to want to see more of, claim to love, brag about discovering before it made it big.

Last year I went nearly every day, seeing a couple of films each trip downtown, and basically had a blast.

Typically the Fanboy Planet staff coverage of Cinequest is a few articles and recorded interviews with the Cinequest guests and filmmakers.  We do a lot of that, and it’s great stuff. I made a lot of friends, got into some really interesting conversations, and we produced a lot of coverage of the festival.

But this year I decided I wanted to do a bit more, to challenge myself to journal every film I see this year.

cinequestposterNormally this would be something that would go right to the main Fanboy Planet website. But unfortunately it’s still a bit of work to get something written, uploaded, fit in images, proof, and generally make it worthy of being up and live on the site. And I needed to be able to do the writing and production quickly to stay true to my goal. I want to try to cover films that, if you live in the Bay Area, you’ll have a chance to see as well at the festival. Click on the poster for more information and how to buy tickets.

So I decided that this would be a two-phase production.  Quick postings to my WordPress blog, where I can get things written and readable. Then later pushing the same text and images, perhaps after Editor in Chief Derek McCaw has had time to proof, to the Fanboy Planet site.

FoCSo you’ll be seeing this logo around because that’s the branding I’ve made for the Fanboy Planet series of articles. And it couldn’t hurt the site for you to go and check out the other great stuff we do there. I expect there’s something for everyone.

In the meantime, I hope you enjoy reading It’s an experiment, but it’s a hopeful one and doubly so in that I hope you enjoy the ride.

batkid-begins-drew-struzanFair Warning: Tomorrow, Tuesday February 24th at 7pm, the festival opens with the feel-good documentary of the year: Batkid Begins.  We’ve been covering this on Fanboy Planet since early last year, and it gets our highest recommendation.  Click here to read Derek McCaw’s review from July of last year.

 

 

Ric Bretschneider
February 23rd, 2015

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